Third Eye Cinema / Weird Scenes Inside the Goldmine podcast
Weird Scenes 6/13/19: Stranger in a Strange Land - the Counterculture of Donald Sutherland

Weird Scenes 6/13/19: Stranger in a Strange Land - the Counterculture of Donald Sutherland

June 13, 2019

This time, we're taking on another counterculture icon!

Tonight we take on a Canadian actor and former radio newsman hailing from New Brunswick and Nova Scotia in his younger days. As such, it's probably no surprise he hails mainly from Scotch stock (with a bit of German in there for good measure)...

He double majored in, of all things, engineering and drama, quickly dropping all the dry bourgeoise practicalities of applied math to pursue acting across Western Europe, doing a lot of work in cult British television and horror films before finding a niche as a rebellious hippie outsider type in several celebrated war films of the late 60's and early 70's - the Dirty Dozen, Kelly's Heroes, the Eagle Has Landed...and he introduced the pivotal role of Hawkeye in the original film version of M.A.S.H., later to make Alan Alda quite possibly the biggest star of the 70's and oft referenced sine qua non of the sensitive post feminist "New Man" of the decade.

Front and center in a number of important films throughout the 70's - Klute, Don't Look Now, Eye of the Needle, work with Fellini and Bertolucci, even Animal House - he'd close the decade with an even more paranoid and effective update of the 50's sci fi classic Invasion of the Body Snatchers, before falling into a long run of workaday films that kept the bills paid but offer little of interest to the cult film aficionado.

well...there IS Buffy the Vampire Slayer to contend with, and the tween Sci-Fi bowlderization of Battle Royale, The Hunger Games. Hell, he even wound up in a Kate Bush video!

So join us as we talk one of the true icons of 60's and 70's cinema and Canada's finest, the one and only Donald Sutherland!

Week 67: Stranger in a Strange Land: the Counterculture of Donald Sutherland

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Weird Scenes 5/30/19: That Knowing Smile, That Piercing Gaze: The Tao of Charlotte Rampling

Weird Scenes 5/30/19: That Knowing Smile, That Piercing Gaze: The Tao of Charlotte Rampling

May 30, 2019

Charlotte Rampling, like Diana Rigg and many others of her generation, began her career as a 60's fashion model.

After bit parts in such well remembered films as A Hard Days Night and The Knack and How to Get It, she stepped into a major role in the seminal Swinging London kitchen sink drama Georgy Girl, which got her noticed and brought over to Italy where she showed up in two WWII related epics that made her famous (and perhaps unintentionally helped kick off a certain infamous and short lived exploitation subgenre in Italy, France and the US): Visconti's The Damned and Liliana Cavani's The Night Porter.

Making minor waves and memorable if brief appearances in everything from existential counterculture opuses like Vanishing Point and much feted dramedies like Woody Allen's Stardust Memories to neo-Noirs like Farewell My Lovely and Angel Heart and cheesefests like Zardoz and Orca, tonight we celebrate the cool yet sexually charged Emma Peel-style appeal of the lovely Charlotte Rampling, only here on Weird Scenes!

Week 66: That Knowing Smile, That Piercing Gaze: The Tao of Charlotte Rampling

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https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/third-eye-cinema-weird-scenes-inside-the-goldmine-podcast/id553402044

Weird Scenes 5/16/19: From Brixton to Brexiteer: The Films of Michael Caine

Weird Scenes 5/16/19: From Brixton to Brexiteer: The Films of Michael Caine

May 16, 2019

Born to a poor Cockney fishmonger and charwoman (you know, the folks that come around after hours to clean the office?), Michael Caine quickly discovered some important things about himself and the world around during a then-mandatory stint in National Service…a shattering of ivory tower illusions about communism, and a zest to live each day as if it were your last.

Making his way up through the usual bit parts on television and film, his first big break came when cast in a fairly major part in a tale of a ragtag band of wounded soldiers against an army nearly thirty times its size in Stanley Baker’s Zulu.

Not long after, he’d make his way through a trio of films based on (and a few along similar lines to) the gritty, more realistic answer to the James Bond films, Harry Palmer, starring in well remembered films like Alfie, the Italian Job, Get Carter and the Destructors, cementing his reputation as a likeable, down to earth leading man before lapsing into paycheck jobs like The Swarm, Beyond the Poseidon Adventure and The Hand, and more infamous fare like Brian DePalma’s Dressed to Kill and Jaws 4: the Revenge, before winding up cast as Alfred in Batman Begins, Dark Knight and Dark Knight Rises…

Somewhat controversial for his years in tax exile and support of Brexit, the man nonetheless leaves behind a plethora of memorable film, both in the accepted and camp sense of the word…and to quote the man himself:

Not many people know that!

Week 65: From Brixton to Brexiteer: The Films of Michael Caine

 

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Weird Scenes 5/2/19: Disreputable: the cult cinema of David Hemmings

Weird Scenes 5/2/19: Disreputable: the cult cinema of David Hemmings

May 2, 2019

With his sleepy eyed look and tousled blond locks, he came across as some amalgamation of Robert and Chris Mitchum...with more than a touch of Paul McCartney as a finisher. Generally strolling through films as oddly passive, even disinterested, he could flip to a crazed enervation unexpectedly, leading him to serve as the ultimate outsider figure: either failing to react or overreacting to the events onscreen, in turn.

Seldom a lead but always a presence, he effortlessly shifted from star boy soprano under famed modernist composer Benjamin Britten to child actor to that rarest of transitions: a popular adult career in cinema, as both actor and eventually director of film and television.

Having starred in a handful of the most celebrated films of our time (Blow Up, Deep Red, even the strangely popular Barbarella), he’d wind down his career working through increasingly obscure parts in nearly forgotten films across the UK and Italy, before making a long and successful end run in American television throughout the 80’s and 90’s, where most of his directorial work took place.

Join us as we discuss the genre oddities and decidedly quirky career of David Hemmings, only here on Weird Scenes!

Week 64: Disreputable: the cult cinema of David Hemmings

 

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https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/third-eye-cinema-weird-scenes-inside-the-goldmine-podcast/id553402044

Weird Scenes 4/18/19: He Always Comes Back - the films of Arnold Schwarzenegger

Weird Scenes 4/18/19: He Always Comes Back - the films of Arnold Schwarzenegger

April 18, 2019

Born into a stiff, lower middle class Austrian background just after the war, Arnold Schwarzenegger rebelled from his rigid father and proscribed life at an early age, eschewing the family plans for his life and career to pursue a rocky road in the dubious world of bodybuilding.

Idolizing the likes of up and coming cinematic pepla stars like Steve Reeves and especially Reg Park, the young Arnold followed his dreams from breaking into local gyms to work out on off hours to participating in international contests and a solo move to America, without even possessing a proper command of the English language.

Catching the attention of big names in the physical fitness field like Britain's Wag Bennett and America's Joe Wieder, the young up and comer became the face of Wieder's supplement and equipment empire for many a year, his association with the famed Muscle and Fitness magazine running well into recent years.

Taking major titles like Mr. Olympia and Mr. Universe multiple times apiece, by the time the documentary Pumping Iron popularized what had been seen as something of a mockable geek sideshow into the exercise craze of the past 40 years, he'd already starred in two feature films as lead or top billed costar to big names like Jeff Bridges, Sally Field and even ubiquitous comedian/voice actor Arnold Stang...and the best was yet to come.

For with the dawn of the 1980s came a starring role in a grim, philosophical take on Robert E. Howard's famed barbarian warrior and king...and a long career in quip-heavy, surprisingly light hearted action cinema began.

Parlaying his successes in both bodybuilding and cinema into a political career, he's become not only a two term state governor, but expanding his ostensible party politik to become one of the more outspoken voices both for green initiatives and against perhaps the most corrupt administration ever to sit in office...

Always surprising, never stagnating, tonight we celebrate the life and films of the Austrian Oak and Governator himself, the inimitable Arnold Schwarzenegger!

Week 63: He Always Comes Back: the life and films of Arnold Schwarzenegger

 

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https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/third-eye-cinema-weird-scenes-inside-the-goldmine-podcast/id553402044